Posts

Posts uit maart, 2017 weergeven

R.I.P. Giorgio Capitani

Afbeelding
Giorgio Capitani dies at the good age of 89
And yet another one has left us: Giorgio Capitani, director of Ognuno Per Sé passed away in his home town Viterbo at the ripe old age of 89.
In his home country Giorgio Capitani was best known among large audiences for directing a long-running crime televison series, Il Maresciallo Rocca, situated in his beloved hometown Viterbo. But Capitani was also a very prolific film maker who directed more than fifty movies. At a very young age he already made a couple of home movies (they served as an introduction in the real movie business). He made his debut in the 1950s and worked within various genres such as romantic drama (Delirio, 1954), peplum (Ercole, Sansone, Maciste e Ursus gli invincibili, 1964), and especially comedy (L'arcangelo, 1969; Pane, burro e marmellata, 1977).
# Ognuno Per Sé (1968)
Capitani made only one spaghetti western, but it was a good one and it was also one of his own favorite movies: Ognuno per Sé, internationally b…

R.I.P. Tomás Milián - Cuchillo forever

Afbeelding
R.I.P. Tomás Milián - Cuchillo forever
Tomás Milián who died last week from a stroke in his apartment in Miami, was born in Havana, Cuba, on March 3, 1933. His father was an army general under Gerardo Machado, president of Cuba between 1925 and 1933. After the collapse of Machado's government, Tomás' father was arrested and jailed; he was released later, but denied most of his civil rights.  In 1946, a 12-year old Tomás witnessed the suicide of his father, an event that would scar the young man for life. In 1957 the family moved to the US.
Tomás became a student of Lee Strasberg, studying method acting at the Actors Studio in New York City. He was offered a few minor roles in major productions but decided to move to Italy to prove his luck in the then flourishing Italian movie industry. In the late 1950s and early 1960s he appeared as a supporting actor in several movies produced and directed by Mauro Bolognini.
In 1965 Spanish director Eugenio Martin offered him a role in th…

Silence: The Happy Ending

Afbeelding
Silence: The Happy Ending 
The Great Silence, or in Italian Il Grande Silenzio (1968, Sergio Corbucci) is generally referred to as 'that western in the snow'. Snow-capped hills are an unusual, but not unique setting for a western, and what really sets the movie apart is the bleak ending that seems to turn ever western cliché upside down, including the often heard idea that in a western the good guy always wins. Yes, in this movie the bad guys win, in gruesome fashion. People who watch the movie unprepared, are often shocked by the grim, ultra bleak ending. I remember that I was nearly blown out of my socks when I first saw the movie, in the Eighties, on a French VHS. Mon Dieu, good grief, what the hell was that ?


Upon its original release, The Great Silence was not very successful in Italy, even though several reviews were positive. Very violent for its time, with thumbs shot off and blood dripping from fractured skulls, the film got an ’18 rating’, which meant young Italians, …